About

Thank you for visiting.  Should you wish to contact me, just leave a comment at one of the posts.  Comments arrive directly at my email, where I decide if they are worth publishing or not (said with humor, but also truth).

Your wonderful comments facilitate discussion of fashion, art, history – and possibly, positive energy!

  • surf music of the 60s
  • spaghetti western music (Ennio Morricone is a favorite)
  • music of Piero Piccioni
  • music of Jean Jacques Perrey
  • energetic classical music
  • digitally created and synthesized sound
  • music that sounds as if it belongs in a dance club of the future
  • humanity toward animals and respect of their intelligence
  • old dictionaries
  • old fashioned mail
  • visualizing life of future
  • color, color, color in every medium… paint, paper, fabric
  • books… real, made with paper – with deckle edges
  • the scents of lemon, sandalwood, honeysuckle, bergamot, cloves, mint, crayons, mown grass, chypre, pencil shavings, and old books
  • libraries everywhere
  • museums
  • cloud configurations
  • Busby Berkeley
  • the look of trees before a storm  – with their leaves silver

Other blogs I moderate:

  • Art Fashion Creation at blogspot.com (discussion and links to every shape form and fashion related to art, fashion, or creation)
  • Toile La La at blogspot.com (original version of Art Fashion Creation)
  • Worn Written Drawn at wordpress.com (minimal text, maximum imagery, positive thinking, creating a museum within your own mind, poetry)
  • Comment Cultivator at wordpress.com (visit and share your ideas for generating topic discussion or creating a forum of like minds)

You’ll see this photo accompanying comments I leave during my forays to other fashion, art, or design blogs. I was a passenger on that bike my grandfather drove. Brisk bicycle rides in the country are still a favorite escape.

3 thoughts on “About

  1. Recurring dream of goldfish says:

    Thank you for warming my heart with your kind and thoughtful words and thank you for bringing me here where there are such gorgeous designs and inspiration to take in.
    I love your blog(s).

  2. Robyn Hill says:

    Great to see Bicorns mentioned again. I had one made in the mid 1980’s by Kirsten Woodward in London. I have a question,do you know much about the the 1960’s/70’s french magazine Chapeau ? I have a couple of copies to sell and can’t seem to find out much about them.
    Regards

    Robyn

    • toilelala says:

      Robyn, How wonderful to have a custom-made ’80s Kirsten Woodward bicorne! You inspired me to read about and view images of Woodward’s millinery designs and they are intriguing – fabulous.

      I wonder if your bicorne is collapsible, or was it blocked and how large is (or was) it. I like all bicornes – nevertheless, towering, petite, collapsible or not. And with plumes – a bicorne is just so important-looking… prestigious.

      No, the vintage French magazine Chapeau is news to me! I did however conduct a bit of research – even looking for images of covers, but could find only a lifestyle magazine of that name – followed by an exclamation mark – from Limburg, Germany. It seems that is not the magazine you’re referring to – as you are probably mentioning a millinery magazine – n’est-ce pas. Of course, it would certainly be beneficial to know the publisher and publication dates of such magazines. If you have a blog, perhaps you might show there images of the covers paired with a summary of the magazine contents.

      I’m happy you enjoyed reading my dressesandhats bicorne post. Your comment has prompted me to post another bicorne post, so thank you.

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